Update: Campground services are closed for 2020. Be sure to check back to 2021 for any updates to dates of operation.

The Park is open year round unless inaccessible due to weather conditions, especially during the off-season.


Description Dates
Gate Access & Services Jun 1-Sept 9
Reservable None

Vehicle Access Sites 28
Reservable Sites None
Non-reservable Sites 28

The 58 hectare park is situated on the Kiskatinaw River beside the iconic wooden bridge. Park users enjoy taking their families down to the river for a swim or to go fishing. There is also a playground for children to play.

The 58 hectare park is situated on the Kiskatinaw River beside the iconic wooden bridge. Park users enjoy taking their families down to the river for a swim or to go fishing. There is also a playground for children to play.

The Alaska Highway House is the newest Dawson Creek downtown attraction. This interpretive center conveys what life was like during the Alaska Highway’s construction.

Visit The Walter Wright Pioneer Village! A great place to tour old buildings and experience the look and feel of pioneer days in Dawson Creek. In summer months, visitors can also have a quick lunch and check out the gift shop.

Dawson Creek Art Gallery

Dawson Creek Resource Centre

For thousands of years, nomadic hunters, occupied the Peace River region. The two major language groups in the Peace River area are the Athapaskan and the Algonquian. Some of the Beaver have preserved their Athapaskan tongue, while the Algonquian language, is still used by a few Cree people of the area.

The arrival of the Hudson's Bay Company in Eastern Canada in 1670, eventually had a major impact in the Peace River area.

Large agricultural settlement, in Western Canada, brought people from all over the world into the Peace River country.

During the Second World War one of the greatest engineering feats of the century was initiated --the building of a 1520-mile highway which would connect Alaska to Canada and the United States. Over 11,000 troops endured mosquitoes, black flies, and extreme weather conditions to construct a route over muskeg, mud and river.

At mile 20 on the original highway, the Kiskatinaw River posed an early obstacle. The location of the bridge site, near a hairpin turn on the river, forced construction of a curved right-of-way. Engineers developed this 190-foot wooden bridge, with a super elevated (banked) nine-degree curve, to conform with the bend of the highway.

Contracted by a Canadian company, construction of this engineering marvel took nine months to complete. It was the first curved, wooden bridge, built in Canada. Today, it is the only curved, banked trestle bridge remaining in Western Canada.

Landscape

You can find Balsam Fir, White/Englewood Spruce and Trempling Aspen in the surrounding forests.

Wildlife

Park users will also have a chance to see moose, white tail deer, various small critters and songbirds. The Peace Region is popular among bird enthusiasts because of the wide various of birds that frequent the area.

Birds

This EcoProvince supports 61% of all bird species known to occur in British Columbia. The many wetlands, ponds, and slow-moving streams on the upland surface provide excellent habitat for breeding and migrating water birds.

Some of the rarest shorebirds in British Columbia migrate regularly through the Peace Lowland Ecosection including the Hudsonian Godwit, White-rumped Sandpiper, and Stilt Sandpiper. The area is the center of abundance in the Province for Broad-Winged Hawk, Sharp-Tailed Grouse, Upland Sandpiper, Franklin's Gull, common Grackle and Eastern Phoebe. It is the only breeding area in the province for Philadelphia Vireo, Chestnut-sided Warbler, Black-Throated Green Warbler and Connecticut Warbler.

Alcoholic beverages is not allowed in the picnic shelter and surrounding public areas.